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Questionnaire: What Would You Do in a Pet Emergency?

By: Hsin-Yi Cohen BSc, MA, MSt - Updated: 27 Aug 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Pet Emergency Accident First-aid Prepare

We all like to think that we would be able to remain calm and know how to react in an emergency but if a sudden illness or injury threatened your pet, would you know what to do? Would you be able to do the right thing? Take this quiz and find out:

Questionnaire

1) If your dog or cat is injured and you want to examine him, the first thing you should do is:

  • a) hold him in your arms
  • b) gently muzzle him
  • c) cover him with a blanket
  • d) give him some water

2) You know your pet is choking because:

  • a) he is screaming
  • b) he is coughing and wheezing
  • c) he has trouble breathing and keeps pawing his mouth; his lips and tongue may be blue
  • d) he is drooling a lot

3) If you suspect that your pet has been poisoned, you should:

  • a) immediately try to make him vomit
  • b) give him lots of water to flush out the poison
  • c) give him some food to soak up the poison
  • d) find out what the poison is and how much has been ingested then call your vet or animal poison control centre for advice

4) You have prepared for pet emergencies by:

  • a) assembling a pet first-aid kit and making sure you know how to use it
  • b) watching lots of animal rescue programmes on TV
  • c) training your pet really well
  • d) making sure your pet is vaccinated and wormed

5) If your pet is bleeding, you should:

  • a) quickly give him lots of water to replace the lost fluids
  • b) apply a tourniquet
  • c) apply direct pressure over the site of bleeding
  • d) bandage the area up really tight

6) If you think your pet has broken a leg, you should:

  • a) transport the pet to the vet immediately while stabilising the injured limb as best you can
  • b) gently pull or tug the limp to set the fracture and prevent further damage
  • c) bandage the limb up tightly
  • d) make your pet stay in bed

7) If your pet is breathing irregularly and has very wide, dilated eyes, this means:

  • a) he is very happy
  • b) he is in a coma
  • c) he has brain damage
  • d) he is in shock

8) If you suspect your pet has heatstroke, you should:

  • a) give your pet some ice cubes
  • b) put him in the shade or in an air-conditioned room
  • c) put him in a tub of cool water, soak him with a garden hose or wrap him with a cool wet towel
  • d) put some sunscreen on him

9) Your vet’s contact details are:

  • a) somewhere in the phone book
  • b) in an easily viewable place e.g. fridge door, kitchen bulletin board, by the phone
  • c) you don’t know them
  • d) in a file in your study

10) The best thing to do when your pet is having a seizure is to:

  • a) gently put your arms around him to restrain him so he doesn’t hurt himself
  • b) put him in a tub of cool water
  • c) wrap him up in a thick blanket
  • d) move him away from any harmful objects and time the seizure

Answers:

1) B – gently muzzle your pet before examining him as even the most normally docile pet can lash out in pain and frightened

2) C – if you can see the stuck object, try to extract it with a pair of tweezers or pliers but be very careful of pushing it further down the windpipe. If your pet collapses or the item is lodged too deep in their throat, try placing both hands on either side of the rib cage and applying quick, firm pressure – or place your pet on his side and firmly strike the side of his ribcage with the palm of your hand 3 or 4 times. Keep repeating this until you arrive at the vet’s office.

3) D – different poisons can have very different methods of treatment and even seemingly harmless things like water can react with other chemicals and cause serious reactions which may further injure your pet, so always get expert advice in the case of any poisonings before attempting treatment

4) A – every responsible pet owner should have a well-stocked pet first-aid kit and have familiarised themselves with how to use it.

5) C – keep applying pressure over bleeding until it stops – constantly taking the pressure off to check the wound can make things worse so make sure you continue for at least 10mins.

6) A – you must never try to set a fracture yourself as you can easily cause further damage. Stabilise the area and take your pet to the vet immediately

7) D – shock is quite common following an injury or accident; make sure your pet is kept warm, quiet and gently restrained and try to elevate their lower body.

8) C – heatstroke can be serious and life-threatening: it is vital to lower the animal’s body temperature as quickly as possible although beware of over-cooling

9) B – make sure you are familiar with your vet’s contact details and opening hours – and any emergency after-hours vets’ details too – and keep them in an easily accessible, easily remembered place.

10) D – most seizures only last for 2-3mins – it is important that your pet does not hurt himself during this time, however, do not risk injury to yourself by trying to restrain him. Afterwards, keep him calm and quiet. Consult a vet.

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