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Safe Pet Carriers and Crates

By: Tony Lucas - Updated: 29 Sep 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Pet Crate Pet Carrier Pet Transporting

With people being more mobile these days the need for a safe way to transport pets arises often.One of the best ways to do this is in one of the many varieties of Pet Carriers or Crates that are on the market.

What should you look for in a carrier and which ones are safe for your pet?

Looking For the Right One

When hunting for a carrier be sure to get one that caters for both your requirements and the comfort and security of your pet.

Shop around; even ask the advice of your local veterinarian or animal welfare organisation. These people encounter carriers and pet crates daily and know from experience which are best for your pet.

Built to Withstand the Knocks

The carrier you choose should be of sturdy construction.

This is particularly important when it comes to transporting your animal by public transport as the carriers can be knocked around while in transit.

Sturdiness is additionally important, as some nervous animals tend to thrash around, and panic while in their carriers.

Any carrier that is well constructed, should easily be able to withstand such knocks and bumps without falling apart.

How Big is too Big?

The carrier you buy should be large enough to allow the animal to stand up, turn around, and lie in a comfortable position.It should not be so large that the animal will slide around inside it while being transported. A correctly sized carrier should actually make your pet feel more secure during transport.

Keeping Things Clean

The carrier you choose should have a base capable of holding some form of absorbent material without any leakage or the material going everywhere.

Clean ability is another crucial factor:

  • Is the carrier easily cleanable?
  • Does it come apart to enable you to clean it?
There should be nothing protruding on the interior of the carrier or crate on which the animal can be hooked up on or harm themselves on.

Allow Air to Flow

Adequate ventilation is very important, vehicles get hot and oppressive. In the confined space of a pet carrier, this hot stuffiness is even more pronounced.

Rear and side ventilation are necessary to ensure adequate airflow through the carrier and stop your pet from overheating.

All Buckled in

Strong handles are essential; these will easily enable you to carry your pet.Additionally they will give you a point to secure the carrier to your vehicle using a seatbelt.

The carrier should have a strong, securable door latch to prevent it from coming open by accident, or to stop the animal forcing it open during transit.

Which Way is up?

If your animal is travelling by public transport display labels on the exterior of the carrier or crate showing it contains a live animal. Use directional arrows and labelling to ensure the carrier remains in an upright position.

A good quality carrier or pet crate may cost you more, but it should provide you with a lifetime of use and ensure your pet gets where it is going both comfortably and safely.

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