Home > Kids and Pets > Kids and Strange Dogs

Kids and Strange Dogs

By: Hsin-Yi Cohen BSc, MA, MSt - Updated: 29 Sep 2012 | comments*Discuss
 
Dog Attack Strange Dog Canine Body

While media frenzy and general paranoia may have exaggerated the real danger of dog attacks, it is nevertheless wise to exercise caution when dealing with strange dogs, particularly when children are involved. Many local authorities now run educational programmes aimed at increasing the public's understanding of canine body language and providing information on the correct way to interact with dogs. If you have kids, however, it pays to impress upon them a few simple rules:

Do

  • Always ask the owner for permission before approaching and petting a dog
  • Approach the dog slowly and from the side if possible.
  • Offer the back of your hand gently for the dog to sniff
  • Stroke the dog on the chest or shoulders - avoid the neck and face and remember to be gentle
  • Stand-still if you are approached by a strange dog and you are frightened. Move slowly and quietly away.

Don't

  • Don't rush up to a dog, especially head-on.
  • Don't stare at the dog in the eyes, particularly as you are approaching - dogs find this very threatening or may read it as a challenge.
  • Don't hug the dog around the neck or wrap your arms around its body - this can be very threatening.
  • Don't approach a dog that is eating or sleeping.
  • Don't try to take toys, bones or any other items off a dog you don't know.
  • Never tease or annoy a dog, such as pulling its tail.
  • Never kiss or put your face close to a dog's face.
  • Don't run around and scream or shout near a dog.
  • If you are approached by a strange dog and you are frightened, do not run and scream as this will incite the dog to chase you and it may bite out of excitement.
  • Don't approach a bitch with puppies as she may be particularly protective of them.

Canine Body Language

Dogs give plenty of warning before they are going to attack and in many a cases, a tragedy was preventable if the person had noticed and paid attention to the cues being given. If a dog is showing any signs of fear or unease, particularly if it is cornered or restrained and cannot run away, move away from it immediately as it may be provoked into fear aggression.Here is a summary of the common signals dogs give to convey their state of mind: (remember, a wagging tail does not always mean a happy dog!)

Neutral: mouth relaxed, slightly open and perhaps panting gently, tail relaxed or slow wagging, weight evenly distributed over all four feet.

Alert: eyes large and staring, ears up and forward, muzzle tense, stiff-legged, weight over front-legs, tail up and possibly wagging stiffly and quickly, hackles (hair on shoulder and along back) raised and bristling.

Dominant Aggressive: eyes staring, lips curled back to show teeth - bared and snarling, ears up and forward, hackles raised, charging, weight forward, tail stiff and raised.

Defensive/Fear Aggression: ears back or flat on head, eyes wide and pupils dilated, tail down and tense, possibly between legs, posture crouched, weight over back legs, muzzle tense with lips wrinkled and snarling, teeth exposed, hackles may also be up.

Submissive: eyes half-closed or blinking, ears back, tail hanging low, slow wag, mouth closed, licking lips, paws making "grovelling" motion - in extreme cases, a dog will roll onto its back and expose its belly and even possibly urinate as a sign of submission.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
Why not be the first to leave a comment for discussion, ask for advice or share your story...

If you'd like to ask a question one of our experts (workload permitting) or a helpful reader hopefully can help you... We also love comments and interesting stories

Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Latest Comments
  • gabby
    Re: Introducing a Kitten to Other Cats
    i have an eight year old female cat& i recently got a 3 month old kitten& my older cat keeps hissing and spitting and…
    25 July 2019
  • Paige131
    Re: Introducing a Puppy to Other Dogs
    Hi i have a 8week olf puppy he has had no vaccinations yetbis it ok to take him to my mums where her dogs are fully vaccinated.
    19 July 2019
  • Sylveon
    Re: Keeping Mammals in an Aviary
    Hi I only just discovered this page! I just wanted to ask could there be possible parasite risk between rabbits and birds? As I…
    6 July 2019
  • Osar
    Re: Dog Laws in the UK
    Where can I find the law/by law about my dog entering a local river. There is private fishing (no access to public) and a long stretch of river…
    5 July 2019
  • BOO/100
    Re: Pet Injuries That Can be Treated at Home
    My small dog has a rash on his undercarriage with small red spots I have been bathing this with Apple cyder vinegar…
    3 July 2019
  • Sprinkles
    Re: Dog Laws in the UK
    I live beside someone who has 3 dogs. This person doesn't work but disappears for over 10 hours or all night and doesn't come back until…
    14 June 2019
  • sherrie
    Re: The Dangers of Cat Fights
    our calico cat was in a fight last monday morning and we had to take her to the vet. We had to put her down because she had a deep…
    12 June 2019
  • Kiwi
    Re: The Dangers of Cat Fights
    We recently moved into an apartment that has lots of outdoor cats I don't know if these are ferel cats or pets my cat Kiki likes to go…
    26 May 2019
  • Rani
    Re: Dog Laws in the UK
    Hi I live with my in laws and they have recently bought a dog, hes a big alsatian. I have 4 kids 6,4,2 and 8 months. It's hot and they want to…
    23 May 2019
  • Jillybags
    Re: Keeping Mammals in an Aviary
    So it's ok to have 2 bunnies and ( say ) 4 budgies, lovebirds or cockatiels in the same outdoor aviary ? They'll have plenty of…
    21 May 2019